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Famous Visitors & Famous Marquette Residents Quiz

Test your knowledge of some of Marquette's most famous visitors and inhabitants.

1. In 1913, a famous trial was held at the Marquette County Courthouse, in which the plaintiff was:

A. Lillian Russell

Sorry, the correct answer is D. Theodore Roosevelt sued The Iron Ore newspaper of Ishpeming for accusing him of being drunk when he campaigned in Marquette. At the trial, Roosevelt had several prominent people testify to his drinking habits and he listed every drink he had ever had in his life. After five days of trial, the newspaper editor finally read a prepared statement admitting he was mistaken in his accusations against the former president. Theodore Roosevelt could have been awarded $10,000 under Michigan law, but instead, he requested only six cents for compensation because “That’s about the price of a GOOD paper.” The Iron Ore cost only three cents.

B. Harry Houdini

Sorry, the correct answer is D. Theodore Roosevelt sued The Iron Ore newspaper of Ishpeming for accusing him of being drunk when he campaigned in Marquette. At the trial, Roosevelt had several prominent people testify to his drinking habits and he listed every drink he had ever had in his life. After five days of trial, the newspaper editor finally read a prepared statement admitting he was mistaken in his accusations against the former president. Theodore Roosevelt could have been awarded $10,000 under Michigan law, but instead, he requested only six cents for compensation because “That’s about the price of a GOOD paper.” The Iron Ore cost only three cents.

C. William Howard Taft

Sorry, the correct answer is D. Theodore Roosevelt sued The Iron Ore newspaper of Ishpeming for accusing him of being drunk when he campaigned in Marquette. At the trial, Roosevelt had several prominent people testify to his drinking habits and he listed every drink he had ever had in his life. After five days of trial, the newspaper editor finally read a prepared statement admitting he was mistaken in his accusations against the former president. Theodore Roosevelt could have been awarded $10,000 under Michigan law, but instead, he requested only six cents for compensation because “That’s about the price of a GOOD paper.” The Iron Ore cost only three cents.

D. Theodore Roosevelt

Correct! Theodore Roosevelt sued The Iron Ore newspaper of Ishpeming for accusing him of being drunk when he campaigned in Marquette. At the trial, Roosevelt had several prominent people testify to his drinking habits and he listed every drink he had ever had in his life. After five days of trial, the newspaper editor finally read a prepared statement admitting he was mistaken in his accusations against the former president. Theodore Roosevelt could have been awarded $10,000 under Michigan law, but instead, he requested only six cents for compensation because “That’s about the price of a GOOD paper.” The Iron Ore cost only three cents.

2. Which following famous person never visited Marquette:

A. Helen Keller

Sorry, the correct answer is C. Mark Twain: Helen Keller visited and even took a drive around Presque Isle Park. John Philip Sousa performed at the Marquette Opera House, and Amelia Earhart twice came to Marquette in 1932 and 1935, speaking at Kaufman Auditorium and staying at the Northland (today’s Landmark Inn).

B. John Philip Sousa

Sorry, the correct answer is C. Mark Twain: Helen Keller visited and even took a drive around Presque Isle Park. John Philip Sousa performed at the Marquette Opera House, and Amelia Earhart twice came to Marquette in 1932 and 1935, speaking at Kaufman Auditorium and staying at the Northland (today’s Landmark Inn).

C. Mark Twain

Correct! Helen Keller visited and even took a drive around Presque Isle Park. John Philip Sousa performed at the Marquette Opera House, and Amelia Earhart twice came to Marquette in 1932 and 1935, speaking at Kaufman Auditorium and staying at the Northland (today’s Landmark Inn).

D. Amelia Earhart

Sorry, the correct answer is C. Mark Twain: Helen Keller visited and even took a drive around Presque Isle Park. John Philip Sousa performed at the Marquette Opera House, and Amelia Earhart twice came to Marquette in 1932 and 1935, speaking at Kaufman Auditorium and staying at the Northland (today’s Landmark Inn).

3. Which U.S. President never visited Marquette?

A. Richard Nixon

Correct! Ford, the only president from Michigan, visited and spoke at NMU. George W. Bush was the 2nd president after Taft to visit while in office during his campaign in 2004; he spoke at the Superior Dome. Barack Obama visited in February, 2011, having lunch at Donckers and speaking at Northern Michigan University.

B. Gerald Ford

Sorry, the correct answer is A. Richard Nixon: Ford, the only president from Michigan, visited and spoke at NMU. George W. Bush was the 2nd president after Taft to visit while in office during his campaign in 2004; he spoke at the Superior Dome. Barack Obama visited in February, 2011, having lunch at Donckers and speaking at Northern Michigan University.

C. George W. Bush

Sorry, the correct answer is A. Richard Nixon: Ford, the only president from Michigan, visited and spoke at NMU. George W. Bush was the 2nd president after Taft to visit while in office during his campaign in 2004; he spoke at the Superior Dome. Barack Obama visited in February, 2011, having lunch at Donckers and speaking at Northern Michigan University.

D. Barack Obama

Sorry, the correct answer is A. Richard Nixon: Ford, the only president from Michigan, visited and spoke at NMU. George W. Bush was the 2nd president after Taft to visit while in office during his campaign in 2004; he spoke at the Superior Dome. Barack Obama visited in February, 2011, having lunch at Donckers and speaking at Northern Michigan University.

4. Marquette's Charles Harvey became famous for:

A. Inventing the wireless telegraph.

Sorry, the correct answer is B. Harvey built the elevated railroad from 1867-1870. He died in New York City where it is heard he could hear the trains on the railroad on his deathbed. Harvey also was responsible for building the Soo Locks. Marquette's neighbor town, Harvey, is named for him.

B. Building the elevated railroad in New York City.

Correct! Harvey built the elevated railroad from 1867-1870. He died in New York City where it is heard he could hear the trains on the railroad on his deathbed. Harvey also was responsible for building the Soo Locks. Marquette's neighbor town, Harvey, is named for him.

C. Establishing Chicago's subway system.

Sorry, the correct answer is B. Harvey built the elevated railroad from 1867-1870. He died in New York City where it is heard he could hear the trains on the railroad on his deathbed. Harvey also was responsible for building the Soo Locks. Marquette's neighbor town, Harvey, is named for him.

D. Laying the transatlantic cable.

Sorry, the correct answer is B. Harvey built the elevated railroad from 1867-1870. He died in New York City where it is heard he could hear the trains on the railroad on his deathbed. Harvey also was responsible for building the Soo Locks. Marquette's neighbor town, Harvey, is named for him.

5. Marquette banker, Louis Graveraet Kaufman is famous for helping to fund:

A. The St. Louis Arch

Sorry, the correct answer is C. The Empire State Building. Kaufman was one of a small group of investors who could afford the $40 million price-tag during the Great Depression.

B. The Hotel Coronado

Sorry, the correct answer is C. The Empire State Building. Kaufman was one of a small group of investors who could afford the $40 million price-tag during the Great Depression.

C. The Empire State Building

Correct! Kaufman was one of a small group of investors who could afford the $40 million price-tag during the Great Depression.

D. The Sears Tower

Sorry, the correct answer is C. The Empire State Building. Kaufman was one of a small group of investors who could afford the $40 million price-tag during the Great Depression.

6. Which first lady may have visited Marquette:

A. Mary Todd Lincoln

Correct! It is believed Mary Todd Lincoln visited in the late 1860s on a ship. To read more, see Mary Todd Lincoln and the ‘Wild Region’ in the Marquette Monthly.

Note: Link opens in new tab or window. Close tab or window to return.

B. Lucy Hayes

Sorry, the correct answer is A. Mary Todd Lincoln. It is believed she visited in the late 1860s on a ship. To read more, see Mary Todd Lincoln and the ‘Wild Region’ in the Marquette Monthly.

Note: Link opens in new tab or window. Close tab or window to return.

C. Eleanor Roosevelt

Sorry, the correct answer is A. Mary Todd Lincoln. It is believed she visited in the late 1860s on a ship. To read more, see Mary Todd Lincoln and the ‘Wild Region’ in the Marquette Monthly.

Note: Link opens in new tab or window. Close tab or window to return.

D. Jackie Kennedy

Sorry, the correct answer is A. Mary Todd Lincoln. It is believed she visited in the late 1860s on a ship. To read more, see Mary Todd Lincoln and the ‘Wild Region’ in the Marquette Monthly.

Note: Link opens in new tab or window. Close tab or window to return.

7. The cast of An Anatomy of a Murder, filmed in Marquette County, includes all but which actor:

A. Jimmy Stewart

Sorry, the correct answer is D. Spencer Tracy. The 1959 film was directed by Otto Preminger and filmed at the Marquette County Courthouse, Mt. Shasta in Michigamme, and Ishpeming locations. The cast included Jimmy Stewart, George C. Scott, Stewart Parnell, Eve Arden, Lee Remick, and Kathryn Crosby.

B. Stewart Parnell

Sorry, the correct answer is D. Spencer Tracy. The 1959 film was directed by Otto Preminger and filmed at the Marquette County Courthouse, Mt. Shasta in Michigamme, and Ishpeming locations. The cast included Jimmy Stewart, George C. Scott, Stewart Parnell, Eve Arden, Lee Remick, and Kathryn Crosby.

C. George C. Scott

Sorry, the correct answer is D. Spencer Tracy. The 1959 film was directed by Otto Preminger and filmed at the Marquette County Courthouse, Mt. Shasta in Michigamme, and Ishpeming locations. The cast included Jimmy Stewart, George C. Scott, Stewart Parnell, Eve Arden, Lee Remick, and Kathryn Crosby.

D. Spencer Tracy

Correct! The 1959 film was directed by Otto Preminger and filmed at the Marquette County Courthouse, Mt. Shasta in Michigamme, and Ishpeming locations. The cast included Jimmy Stewart, George C. Scott, Stewart Parnell, Eve Arden, Lee Remick, and Kathryn Crosby.

8. The owner of Marquette’s Mining Journal in the late 1800s, Alfred Swineford, later became:

A. Ambassador to Finland

Sorry, the correct answer is B. Governor of Alaska. He received the appointment as a reward from the president after he campaigned for him. Although Alaska had other governors in the past, Swineford was the first one actually to live in the state, and he remained there until his death in 1909. He is buried in Juneau, Alaska.

B. Governor of Alaska

Correct! Alfred Swineford received the appointment as a reward from the president after he campaigned for him. Although Alaska had other governors in the past, Swineford was the first one actually to live in the state, and he remained there until his death in 1909. He is buried in Juneau, Alaska.

C. Governor of Hawaii

Sorry, the correct answer is B. Governor of Alaska. He received the appointment as a reward from the president after he campaigned for him. Although Alaska had other governors in the past, Swineford was the first one actually to live in the state, and he remained there until his death in 1909. He is buried in Juneau, Alaska.

D. U.S. Senator from Nevada

Sorry, the correct answer is B. Governor of Alaska. He received the appointment as a reward from the president after he campaigned for him. Although Alaska had other governors in the past, Swineford was the first one actually to live in the state, and he remained there until his death in 1909. He is buried in Juneau, Alaska.

9. Marquette's Mather family was related to which nineteenth century author:

A. Charlotte Perkins Gilman

Sorry, the correct answer is C. Constance Fenimore Woolson. Her sister, Georgianna Woolson, was the mother of William Henry and Samuel L. Mather. Constance Fenimore Woolson was the great-niece of James Fenimore Cooper of Last of the Mohicans fame. Although Woolson never visited Marquette, she was a writer of the Great Lakes, best known for her novel Anne (1882), set on Mackinac Island. When she died her nephew, Samuel L. Mather, had the memorial Anne's Tablet erected to her memory on Mackinac Island. I do not know of any Marquette connections to Charlotte Perkins Gilman or Louisa May Alcott, but Harriet Beecher Stowe was a relative of Marquette's Mary Beecher Longyear.

B. Louisa May Alcott

Sorry, the correct answer is C. Constance Fenimore Woolson. Her sister, Georgianna Woolson, was the mother of William Henry and Samuel L. Mather. Constance Fenimore Woolson was the great-niece of James Fenimore Cooper of Last of the Mohicans fame. Although Woolson never visited Marquette, she was a writer of the Great Lakes, best known for her novel Anne (1882), set on Mackinac Island. When she died her nephew, Samuel L. Mather, had the memorial Anne's Tablet erected to her memory on Mackinac Island. I do not know of any Marquette connections to Charlotte Perkins Gilman or Louisa May Alcott, but Harriet Beecher Stowe was a relative of Marquette's Mary Beecher Longyear.

C. Constance Fenimore Woolson

Correct! Her sister, Georgianna Woolson, was the mother of William Henry and Samuel L. Mather. Constance Fenimore Woolson was the great-niece of James Fenimore Cooper of Last of the Mohicans fame. Although Woolson never visited Marquette, she was a writer of the Great Lakes, best known for her novel Anne (1882), set on Mackinac Island. When she died her nephew, Samuel L. Mather, had the memorial Anne's Tablet erected to her memory on Mackinac Island. I do not know of any Marquette connections to Charlotte Perkins Gilman or Louisa May Alcott, but Harriet Beecher Stowe was a relative of Marquette's Mary Beecher Longyear.

D. Harriet Beecher Stowe

Sorry, the correct answer is C. Constance Fenimore Woolson. Her sister, Georgianna Woolson, was the mother of William Henry and Samuel L. Mather. Constance Fenimore Woolson was the great-niece of James Fenimore Cooper of Last of the Mohicans fame. Although Woolson never visited Marquette, she was a writer of the Great Lakes, best known for her novel Anne (1882), set on Mackinac Island. When she died her nephew, Samuel L. Mather, had the memorial Anne's Tablet erected to her memory on Mackinac Island. I do not know of any Marquette connections to Charlotte Perkins Gilman or Louisa May Alcott, but Harriet Beecher Stowe was a relative of Marquette's Mary Beecher Longyear.

10. Which movie star’s mother was born in Marquette?

A. Ginger Rogers

Sorry, the correct answer is B. Judy Garland. On November 17, 1893, Ethel Milne was born at 509 W. Washington Street in Marquette to John and Eva Milne. John was an engineer for the Duluth South Shore & Atlantic Railroad. The family would include seven children and later move to Michigamme, Michigan before they moved on to Superior, Wisconsin. Ethel would grow up to marry Frank Gumm, and their daughters, the Gumm sisters, would go into show business. The most famous of those sisters, Frances, would later take the name Judy Garland for her films.

B. Judy Garland

Correct! On November 17, 1893, Ethel Milne was born at 509 W. Washington Street in Marquette to John and Eva Milne. John was an engineer for the Duluth South Shore & Atlantic Railroad. The family would include seven children and later move to Michigamme, Michigan before they moved on to Superior, Wisconsin. Ethel would grow up to marry Frank Gumm, and their daughters, the Gumm sisters, would go into show business. The most famous of those sisters, Frances, would later take the name Judy Garland for her films.

C. Lucille Ball

Sorry, the correct answer is B. Judy Garland. On November 17, 1893, Ethel Milne was born at 509 W. Washington Street in Marquette to John and Eva Milne. John was an engineer for the Duluth South Shore & Atlantic Railroad. The family would include seven children and later move to Michigamme, Michigan before they moved on to Superior, Wisconsin. Ethel would grow up to marry Frank Gumm, and their daughters, the Gumm sisters, would go into show business. The most famous of those sisters, Frances, would later take the name Judy Garland for her films.

D. Shirley Temple

Sorry, the correct answer is B. Judy Garland. On November 17, 1893, Ethel Milne was born at 509 W. Washington Street in Marquette to John and Eva Milne. John was an engineer for the Duluth South Shore & Atlantic Railroad. The family would include seven children and later move to Michigamme, Michigan before they moved on to Superior, Wisconsin. Ethel would grow up to marry Frank Gumm, and their daughters, the Gumm sisters, would go into show business. The most famous of those sisters, Frances, would later take the name Judy Garland for her films.

Thanks for taking our quiz. If you enjoyed this, try our Marquette History Quiz or find out which Female or Male character in Tyler Tichelaar's Marquette Trilogy is most like you!