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Marquette History Quiz

How well do you know The Queen City of the North? Take our Marquette History Quiz and see. To answer click on A, B, C, or D below.

1. What year was the City of Marquette founded?

A. 1844

Sorry, the correct answer is:

B. 1849 – Marquette was founded following the 1844 discovery of iron ore near present-day Negaunee, about 9 miles west of Marquette. A harbor was needed for access to the lake to transport the ore south to major places of industry. In 1849, Amos Harlow founded the town for that purpose.

B. 1849

That is correct!

Marquette was founded following the 1844 discovery of iron ore near present-day Negaunee, about 9 miles west of Marquette. A harbor was needed for access to the lake to transport the ore south to major places of industry. In 1849, Amos Harlow founded the town for that purpose.

C. 1851

Sorry, the correct answer is:

B. 1849 – Marquette was founded following the 1844 discovery of iron ore near present-day Negaunee, about 9 miles west of Marquette. A harbor was needed for access to the lake to transport the ore south to major places of industry. In 1849, Amos Harlow founded the town for that purpose.

D. 1857

Sorry, the correct answer is:

B. 1849 – Marquette was founded following the 1844 discovery of iron ore near present-day Negaunee, about 9 miles west of Marquette. A harbor was needed for access to the lake to transport the ore south to major places of industry. In 1849, Amos Harlow founded the town for that purpose.

2. What was the original name proposed for Marquette?

A. Cleveland

Sorry, the correct answer is:

C. While Cleveland and Jackson were both names of early mining companies and Philo Everett one of Marquette’s first residents, the town was originally named Worcester after Worcester, Massachusetts, hometown of Marquette’s founder, Amos Harlow. However, ship captains already referred to the area as Marquette so eventually that name became predominant.

B. Jackson

Sorry, the correct answer is:

C. While Cleveland and Jackson were both names of early mining companies and Philo Everett one of Marquette’s first residents, the town was originally named Worcester after Worcester, Massachusetts, hometown of Marquette’s founder, Amos Harlow. However, ship captains already referred to the area as Marquette so eventually that name became predominant.

C. Worcester

That is correct!

While Cleveland and Jackson were both names of early mining companies and Philo Everett one of Marquette’s first residents, the town was originally named Worcester after Worcester, Massachusetts, hometown of Marquette’s founder, Amos Harlow. However, ship captains already referred to the area as Marquette so eventually that name became predominant.

D. Everett

Sorry, the correct answer is:

C. While Cleveland and Jackson were both names of early mining companies and Philo Everett one of Marquette’s first residents, the town was originally named Worcester after Worcester, Massachusetts, hometown of Marquette’s founder, Amos Harlow. However, ship captains already referred to the area as Marquette so eventually that name became predominant.

3. Why was Marquette the name eventually chosen for the town?

A. Father Marquette died in the area

Sorry, the correct answer is:

D. Father Marquette is believed to have held a large Mass around what is Marquette’s Lighthouse Point today where he converted many of the native Ojibwa. Marquette was born in France and died along the Lake Michigan shoreline of Michigan. His remains were later transported by local Native Americans to St. Ignace, Michigan, where he had founded a mission.

B. Father Marquette was born on these shores

Sorry, the correct answer is:

D. Father Marquette is believed to have held a large Mass around what is Marquette’s Lighthouse Point today where he converted many of the native Ojibwa. Marquette was born in France and died along the Lake Michigan shoreline of Michigan. His remains were later transported by local Native Americans to St. Ignace, Michigan, where he had founded a mission.

C. Father Marquette is buried in the area

Sorry, the correct answer is:

D. Father Marquette is believed to have held a large Mass around what is Marquette’s Lighthouse Point today where he converted many of the native Ojibwa. Marquette was born in France and died along the Lake Michigan shoreline of Michigan. His remains were later transported by local Native Americans to St. Ignace, Michigan, where he had founded a mission.

D. Father Marquette converted Native Americans there

That is correct!

Father Marquette is believed to have held a large Mass around what is Marquette’s Lighthouse Point today where he converted many of the native Ojibwa. Marquette was born in France and died along the Lake Michigan shoreline of Michigan. His remains were later transported by local Native Americans to St. Ignace, Michigan, where he had founded a mission.

4. Marquette suffered a terrible fire that destroyed most of the town in what year?

A. 1858

Sorry, the correct answer is:

B. 1868. The fire began in the machine shop engine room of Marquette & Ontonagon Railroad. It wiped out most of the town from present day Baraga Avenue up the hill past Washington Street. It did not reach the Ridge where Peter White was building the first of many fine homes. It did not cross Baraga Avenue (then called Superior Street) because it was the widest street in town and the flames could not reach that far. Everything in between was completely destroyed. The residents quickly rebuilt. You can read a dramatic retelling of the fire in Iron Pioneers: The Marquette Trilogy, Book One

B. 1868

That is correct!

The fire began in the machine shop engine room of Marquette & Ontonagon Railroad. It wiped out most of the town from present day Baraga Avenue up the hill past Washington Street. It did not reach the Ridge where Peter White was building the first of many fine homes. It did not cross Baraga Avenue (then called Superior Street) because it was the widest street in town and the flames could not reach that far. Everything in between was completely destroyed. The residents quickly rebuilt. You can read a dramatic retelling of the fire in Iron Pioneers: The Marquette Trilogy, Book One

C. 1873

Sorry, the correct answer is:

B. 1868. The fire began in the machine shop engine room of Marquette & Ontonagon Railroad. It wiped out most of the town from present day Baraga Avenue up the hill past Washington Street. It did not reach the Ridge where Peter White was building the first of many fine homes. It did not cross Baraga Avenue (then called Superior Street) because it was the widest street in town and the flames could not reach that far. Everything in between was completely destroyed. The residents quickly rebuilt. You can read a dramatic retelling of the fire in Iron Pioneers: The Marquette Trilogy, Book One

D. 1890

Sorry, the correct answer is:

B. 1868. The fire began in the machine shop engine room of Marquette & Ontonagon Railroad. It wiped out most of the town from present day Baraga Avenue up the hill past Washington Street. It did not reach the Ridge where Peter White was building the first of many fine homes. It did not cross Baraga Avenue (then called Superior Street) because it was the widest street in town and the flames could not reach that far. Everything in between was completely destroyed. The residents quickly rebuilt. You can read a dramatic retelling of the fire in Iron Pioneers: The Marquette Trilogy, Book One

5. Hampson Gregory was:

A. The founder of the First National Bank

Sorry, the correct answer is:

D. Known as “the man who made Marquette beautiful,” Hampson Gregory was a native of Devonshire who built many early buildings of sandstone in Marquette, most notably St. Peter’s Cathedral and Downtown’s Harlow Block as well as many fine homes on Ridge Street. Gregory’s home still stands at 301 N. Fourth Street.

B. Chief shareholder of the Cleveland Mining Company

Sorry, the correct answer is:

D. Known as “the man who made Marquette beautiful,” Hampson Gregory was a native of Devonshire who built many early buildings of sandstone in Marquette, most notably St. Peter’s Cathedral and Downtown’s Harlow Block as well as many fine homes on Ridge Street. Gregory’s home still stands at 301 N. Fourth Street.

C. The founder of the Huron Mountain Club

Sorry, the correct answer is:

D. Known as “the man who made Marquette beautiful,” Hampson Gregory was a native of Devonshire who built many early buildings of sandstone in Marquette, most notably St. Peter’s Cathedral and Downtown’s Harlow Block as well as many fine homes on Ridge Street. Gregory’s home still stands at 301 N. Fourth Street.

D. The builder of St. Peter’s Cathedral

That is correct!

Known as “the man who made Marquette beautiful,” Hampson Gregory was a native of Devonshire who built many early buildings of sandstone in Marquette, most notably St. Peter’s Cathedral and Downtown’s Harlow Block as well as many fine homes on Ridge Street. Gregory’s home still stands at 301 N. Fourth Street.

6. Peter White was a local benefactor who:

A. Founded the Children’s Museum

Sorry, the correct answer is:

B. Peter White purchased Presque Isle Park for the City of Marquette in 1886 from the Federal Government. The City did not want the property because it was thought too far away from the city so it wouldn’t be used and it was difficult to reach. Peter White then built the road to it, lined it with Lombardy Poplars, and hired famous landscaper Frederick Law Olmsted to lay out the roads for the park. White would also be the major donor for the library that today bears his name, and the Morgan Memorial Chapel at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, in memory of his deceased son.

B. Purchased Presque Isle Park for the City

That is correct!

Peter White purchased Presque Isle Park for the City of Marquette in 1886 from the Federal Government. The City did not want the property because it was thought too far away from the city so it wouldn’t be used and it was difficult to reach. Peter White then built the road to it, lined it with Lombardy Poplars, and hired famous landscaper Frederick Law Olmsted to lay out the roads for the park. White would also be the major donor for the library that today bears his name, and the Morgan Memorial Chapel at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, in memory of his deceased son.

C. Founded St. Mary’s Hospital

Sorry, the correct answer is:

B. Peter White purchased Presque Isle Park for the City of Marquette in 1886 from the Federal Government. The City did not want the property because it was thought too far away from the city so it wouldn’t be used and it was difficult to reach. Peter White then built the road to it, lined it with Lombardy Poplars, and hired famous landscaper Frederick Law Olmsted to lay out the roads for the park. White would also be the major donor for the library that today bears his name, and the Morgan Memorial Chapel at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, in memory of his deceased son.

D. Donated the land for the Holy Family Orphanage

Sorry, the correct answer is:

B. Peter White purchased Presque Isle Park for the City of Marquette in 1886 from the Federal Government. The City did not want the property because it was thought too far away from the city so it wouldn’t be used and it was difficult to reach. Peter White then built the road to it, lined it with Lombardy Poplars, and hired famous landscaper Frederick Law Olmsted to lay out the roads for the park. White would also be the major donor for the library that today bears his name, and the Morgan Memorial Chapel at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, in memory of his deceased son.

7. St. Peter’s Cathedral in Marquette includes the tomb of the following person up for sainthood:

A. Father Jacques Marquette

Sorry, the correct answer is:

D. Bishop Frederic Baraga, the first bishop of the Marquette Diocese and known as the Snowshoe Priest. Sainthood requires proof of a miracle and several have been presented and are awaiting approval from the Vatican. Father Marquette is buried in St. Ignace. The martyred Isaac Jogues was killed in New York in 1646. He is already a saint because he was martyred. Blessed Kateri Tekakwitha, born where St. Isaac Jogues was martyred, died in Quebec.

B. Father Isaac Jogues

Sorry, the correct answer is:

D. Bishop Frederic Baraga, the first bishop of the Marquette Diocese and known as the Snowshoe Priest. Sainthood requires proof of a miracle and several have been presented and are awaiting approval from the Vatican. Father Marquette is buried in St. Ignace. The martyred Isaac Jogues was killed in New York in 1646. He is already a saint because he was martyred. Blessed Kateri Tekakwitha, born where St. Isaac Jogues was martyred, died in Quebec.

C. Blessed Kateri Tekakwitha

Sorry, the correct answer is:

D. Bishop Frederic Baraga, the first bishop of the Marquette Diocese and known as the Snowshoe Priest. Sainthood requires proof of a miracle and several have been presented and are awaiting approval from the Vatican. Father Marquette is buried in St. Ignace. The martyred Isaac Jogues was killed in New York in 1646. He is already a saint because he was martyred. Blessed Kateri Tekakwitha, born where St. Isaac Jogues was martyred, died in Quebec.

D. Bishop Frederic Baraga

That is correct!

Bishop Frederic Baraga, the first bishop of the Marquette Diocese and known as the Snowshoe Priest. Sainthood requires proof of a miracle and several have been presented and are awaiting approval from the Vatican. Father Marquette is buried in St. Ignace. The martyred Isaac Jogues was killed in New York in 1646. He is already a saint because he was martyred. Blessed Kateri Tekakwitha, born where St. Isaac Jogues was martyred, died in Quebec.

8. The children’s classic Dandelion Cottage was written by Marquette author:

A. Holly Wilson

Sorry, the correct answer is:

C. Carroll Watson Rankin wrote Dandelion Cottage in 1904 after her daughter complained that she had read all the books ever written for little girls. She later wrote three sequels to the novel and several other children's books. Holly Wilson was author of The Hundred Steps (1958) set in a fictional Marquette, and Dorothy Maywood Byrd authored Granite Harbor (1944) also set in a fictional Marquette. Olive Harlow, wife of city founder Amos Harlow, wrote no books but did keep a diary which is important as a document of early life in Marquette. Dandelion Cottage is still in print today and available at the Marquette Regional History Center.

B. Dorothy Maywood Byrd

Sorry, the correct answer is:

C. Carroll Watson Rankin wrote Dandelion Cottage in 1904 after her daughter complained that she had read all the books ever written for little girls. She later wrote three sequels to the novel and several other children's books. Holly Wilson was author of The Hundred Steps (1958) set in a fictional Marquette, and Dorothy Maywood Byrd authored Granite Harbor (1944) also set in a fictional Marquette. Olive Harlow, wife of city founder Amos Harlow, wrote no books but did keep a diary which is important as a document of early life in Marquette. Dandelion Cottage is still in print today and available at the Marquette Regional History Center.

C. Carroll Watson Rankin

That is correct!

Carroll Watson Rankin wrote Dandelion Cottage in 1904 after her daughter complained that she had read all the books ever written for little girls. She later wrote three sequels to the novel and several other children's books. Holly Wilson was author of The Hundred Steps (1958) set in a fictional Marquette, and Dorothy Maywood Byrd authored Granite Harbor (1944) also set in a fictional Marquette. Olive Harlow, wife of city founder Amos Harlow, wrote no books but did keep a diary which is important as a document of early life in Marquette. Dandelion Cottage is still in print today and available at the Marquette Regional History Center.

D. Olive Harlow

Sorry, the correct answer is:

C. Carroll Watson Rankin wrote Dandelion Cottage in 1904 after her daughter complained that she had read all the books ever written for little girls. She later wrote three sequels to the novel and several other children's books. Holly Wilson was author of The Hundred Steps (1958) set in a fictional Marquette, and Dorothy Maywood Byrd authored Granite Harbor (1944) also set in a fictional Marquette. Olive Harlow, wife of city founder Amos Harlow, wrote no books but did keep a diary which is important as a document of early life in Marquette. Dandelion Cottage is still in print today and available at the Marquette Regional History Center.

9. Ripley’s Believe It or Not once featured the story of:

A. The moving of Marquette’s Longyear Mansion

That is correct!

The Longyear Mansion was moved stone by stone beginning in 1903 on 190 railroad cars over a three-year period—longer than it initially took to build the house. The sandstone mansion contained sixty-five rooms including a bowling alley in the basement. When the Longyears moved to Brookline, Massachusetts they wanted to bring their home with them. You can read the full heartbreaking story of why the Longyears left Marquette in My Marquette.

B. The first U.P. 200 Dog Sled Race

Sorry, the correct answer is:

A. The Longyear Mansion was moved stone by stone beginning in 1903 on 190 railroad cars over a three-year period—longer than it initially took to build the house. The sandstone mansion contained sixty-five rooms including a bowling alley in the basement. When the Longyears moved to Brookline, Massachusetts they wanted to bring their home with them. You can read the full heartbreaking story of why the Longyears left Marquette in My Marquette.

C. The building of the world’s largest wooden dome

Sorry, the correct answer is:

A. The Longyear Mansion was moved stone by stone beginning in 1903 on 190 railroad cars over a three-year period—longer than it initially took to build the house. The sandstone mansion contained sixty-five rooms including a bowling alley in the basement. When the Longyears moved to Brookline, Massachusetts they wanted to bring their home with them. You can read the full heartbreaking story of why the Longyears left Marquette in My Marquette.

D. Marquette’s record snowfall of 1995-1996

Sorry, the correct answer is:

A. The Longyear Mansion was moved stone by stone beginning in 1903 on 190 railroad cars over a three-year period—longer than it initially took to build the house. The sandstone mansion contained sixty-five rooms including a bowling alley in the basement. When the Longyears moved to Brookline, Massachusetts they wanted to bring their home with them. You can read the full heartbreaking story of why the Longyears left Marquette in My Marquette.

10. The 1938 Fire that burnt down much of Downtown Marquette is believed to have begun because:

A. Someone was trying to burn records for St. Paul’s Episcopal Church.

That is correct!

After the fire, an open safe in the church offices was found that suggested someone was trying to burn records. Later, a church scandal would be revealed that involved the Episocopal Bishop and the embezzlement of money. You can read the full dramatic story in My Marquette.

B. The Marquette Fire Department was practicing response times on a condemned building.

Sorry, the correct answer is:

A. After the fire, an open safe in the church offices was found that suggested someone was trying to burn records. Later, a church scandal would be revealed that involved the Episocopal Bishop and the embezzlement of money. You can read the full dramatic story in My Marquette.

C. Teenagers were secretly smoking during the movie in the Nordic Theatre.

Sorry, the correct answer is:

A. After the fire, an open safe in the church offices was found that suggested someone was trying to burn records. Later, a church scandal would be revealed that involved the Episocopal Bishop and the embezzlement of money. You can read the full dramatic story in My Marquette.

D. The cook at the Hotel Marquette left dinner on the stove unattended.

Sorry, the correct answer is:

A. After the fire, an open safe in the church offices was found that suggested someone was trying to burn records. Later, a church scandal would be revealed that involved the Episocopal Bishop and the embezzlement of money. You can read the full dramatic story in My Marquette.