Marquette Fiction

Visit our sister sites

Children of Arthur logo
Children of Arthur

The Gothic Wanderer: From Transgression to Redemption
The Gothic
Wanderer

Superior Book Productions logo
Superior Book Productions

Storytellers' Friend - storytellersfriend.com or storytf.com
Storytellers'
Friend

Upper Peninsula Publishers & Authors Association
Upper Peninsula Publishers & Authors Association

Creating A Local Historical Book:
Fiction and Non-fiction Genres

Does Your City or Region Have a Fascinating Story that needs to be told before it’s forgotten?

Yes, it does, and you can be the person to write it.

In this short book, Tyler Tichelaar, author of My Marquette and The Marquette Trilogy, talks in an interview format about how he became interested in writing both local history and regional and historical fiction and his research and writing process to bring his books to fruition.

Readers of “Creating a Local Historical Book” will learn:

  • What kind of research is required
  • What counts as research
  • Where to do research
  • How to organize that research into a book
  • How not to go overboard with details
  • Finding images and gaining usage permission
  • How to make your book stand out from others
  • Tips on marketing your history book.

Look Inside the Book

Creating A Local Historical Book: Fiction and Non-fiction Genres

Creating
A Local Historical Book:
Fiction and Non-fiction Genres

$7.95

36 Pages, Perfect bound,
Color photos

eBooks

Kindle Edition $2.99
Nook Book $2.99
Kobo $2.95

“Our committee would like to honor Tyler with this award in honor of his meticulous research, his enlightened and personal testimony about Marquette and his educational contributions to the preservation of Marquette’s history.”
– The Marquette Beautification & Restoration Committee, presenting Tyler with the Barbara H. Kelly Historic Preservation Award

“Tyler Tichelaar speaks from the heart about his love affair with the town of his birth. Join him on a nostalgic tour of one of the great small cities of America.”
— Karl Bohnak, author of So Cold a Sky: Upper Michigan Weather Stories